VeteransFirstActYesterday, the leaders of the Senate Committee on Veterans Affairs held a press conference to announce that they had reached an agreement on a piece of legislation that would bring changes to many areas of the VA. The bill, known as the “Veterans First Act,” is the product of intense negotiations among Senators from both parties in recent months. The 391-page bill contains provisions dealing with accountability, healthcare, compensation, education, homelessness, and more. Below, we’ve summarized some of the key provisions.

Accountability

If you’ve been following the various VA scandals in recent years, then many of the bill’s provisions concerning accountability may sound familiar to you. The Veterans First Act would give the VA Secretary more authority to hire and fire employees, and allow him to make his personnel decisions more quickly. It would also limit the amount of time that employees can be placed on “paid administrative leave” to prevent bad actors from collecting government salaries during lengthy investigations. Under the bill, healthcare executives who lead a VA medical center would be entitled to significant pay raises to match what they would earn in the private sector. Perhaps most interestingly, the bill would establish an independent office within the VA known as the “Office of Accountability and Whistle-blower Protection.”

Health Care

Regarding healthcare, the proposed legislation would require the VA to make prompt payment to private facilities that have agreed to participate in the Veterans Choice program. This provision was likely included in response to the many headlines alleging that the VA owes millions of dollars to outside facilities, and that some private providers were electing to abandon the program altogether because they weren’t being paid. The bill would also expand the rules allowing family members to serve as caregivers for severely disabled veterans, and make it easier for the agency to hire mental health professionals. Additionally, the bill would attempt to address the over-prescription of opiate painkillers.

Disability Compensation

The proposed legislation would require the VA to launch a voluntary pilot program under which veterans who opt-in are forbidden from submitting additional evidence after filing a Notice of Disagreement. In exchange for giving-up this important right, veterans in the pilot program would skip the issuance of a Statement of the Case and go straight to the Board of Veterans’ Appeals where they would receive a final decision within one year of filing their Notice of Disagreement. The bill would also make it easier for the survivors of recently deceased veterans to receive benefits, and would increase the oversight of VA Regional Offices by permitting reviews by the Government Accountability Office.

Education & Employment

The Veterans First Act would expand the availability of Post-9/11 GI Bill funds to mobilized reservists, and authorize additional educational benefits to the spouses and children of veterans. It would also permit the VA to reinstate a veteran’s educational benefits in the event that the school the veteran was attending permanently closes. The bill would also require the VA to coordinate with the Department of Labor and state agencies to help increase the availability of jobs for veterans, and would require a non-governmental study of job counseling, training, and placement services for veterans.

Homeless Veterans

Homelessness among veterans has been a widely-discussed topic in recent years, and the proposed legislation aims at further reducing the number of veterans without a roof over their heads. Among the provisions of the bill is one would would expand the definition of “homeless” to include those veterans who are escaping from domestic violence, thus increasing the availability of benefits and services to such veterans. The bill would also expand the eligibility of the Department of Labor’s Homeless Veterans’ Reintegration Program and authorize the VA to form partnerships in order to provide legal services to homeless veterans.

U.S. Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims

The proposed legislation would once again reauthorize the temporary expansion of the Court from seven to nine judges through the end of the year 2020. This represents a compromise from what has been proposed by several lawmakers and veterans’ advocates which would make the increase to nine judges permanent. Additionally, the Veterans First Act would change some rules concerning the availability of certain benefits for judges, and would alter the manner in which the Chief Judge of the Court was determined.

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Overall, we are pleased with the provisions of the proposed legislation. We will say that we were somewhat surprised that the bill does not contain a complete overhaul of the Veterans Choice program, which has drawn much scrutiny for its failure to reduce the delays veterans face in receiving healthcare. The expansion of the Veterans Court is an important step, but we’re disappointed that Congress hasn’t decided to require more decision-makers in the locations they are most needed: at the Board of Veterans’ Appeals. Finally, we’re skeptical of the proposed pilot program for streamlining the appeal process because, simply put, it misidentifies the problem. The issue with appeals has never been that veterans are bogging-down the process by submitting new evidence, its that the VA doesn’t have adequate procedures or sufficient staff to handle the number of claims it receives. Thankfully, for now at least, the Pilot program is only a test.

The bill represents only a proposal from the Senate, and differs in some key ways from what has been proposed over in the House. We expect there to be some changes to the ultimate legislative package that reaches the President’s desk, and we will do our best to keep you posted on future developments.